Comfort Wave Design: The design of comfort

Typing is a big part of daily life. You do it automatically without really thinking about it. But, if you’re like most people, you’re feeling it. That’s what prompted us to rethink keyboard design and create a line of comfortable keyboards that don’t make you relearn how to type, unlike split keyboards.
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An idea right at our fingertips

We set out to create a keyboard that didn’t force you to conform to it—but rather one that conformed to you. The idea? A wave-shaped key frame with varying key heights to mirror the varying lengths of your fingers.

The keys hit by your little fingers would be the highest. Those hit by your middle fingers would be the shortest. You’d be in a more natural position so you wouldn’t need to twist and bend your hands and forearms to type.

Curve + Wave + Palm Rest

Not ones to rest on our laurels, we looked at all of our options. We tried linear designs. Curved designs. Palm rests and no palm rests. And all the possible combinations. When we put them to the test, the clear favorite was the keyboard with curve + wave + palm rest. The Wave keyboard was born.

Details, details

Unlike other curved keyboards, we used consistently sized keys. The subtle 5-degree curve was designed to let your hands open up and take a natural position instead of forcing your wrists to bend. And because each key is the same size and same distance from one another, you wouldn’t need to relearn how to type.

The cushioned, contoured palm rest mirrored the wave-shaped key frame. We added gentle indents to position your hands comfortably on the keyboard and used padded, soft upholstery so you’d have a cushy place to rest your palms when you’re not typing.

Comfort at last

To bring all this comfort to the achy masses, we had to completely redesign nearly every element of the assembly process and our packaging. But the results were worth it. Independent studies show that the Wave keyboards significantly reduce the four major points of discomfort—without causing a noticeable change in typing speed or accuracy.* It’s comfort made easy.

According to studies by two U.S. universities.